Worm Fax and chems for ectos

To: WormMail mailing list (recip. undisclosed)

WormFax NSW Jan 2010

.. is now up on our website:  http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/aboutus/resources/periodicals/newsletters/wormfax/  

(Many thanks to Carla Borin at Veterinary Health Research, Kath Cooper at Regional Vet Lab – Menangle (I&I NSW) – who send me the data each month, and Craig Bratby (web guru) – I&I NSW ).

Chemicals for killing sheep ectos

OK, I am lowering the tone of WormMail by talking about ectoparasites (but, flies and lice are the number 2 and 3 diseases, respectively, of Australian sheep, after worms).

Gemma Junk has just updated a new Primefact on chemicals to treat lice and flies: it can be found on our website:  

http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/livestock/sheep/health/external/chemicals-lice-flystrike

It looks good: I might even copy this to the QAAH-L and DVs’ lists (and Peter James 🙂

Regards

SL


Veterinarian / State Worm Control Coordinator
Industry and Investment NSW ~ Primary Industries
Armidale District Office

Primary Industries ~ LIVESTOCK HEALTH INCL WORMS pages  http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/livestock/health

Primary Industries ~ OFFICE DIRECTORY  http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/aboutus/about/office

WORMBOSS  http://www.wool.com/wormboss

AUSWORMMAIL http://auswormmail.wordpress.com

Ref: Sackett D,Holmes P, Abbott K, Jephcott S and Barber M (2006). Assessing the economic cost of endemic disease on the profitability of Australian beef cattle and sheep producers. Published April 2006 by Meat & Livestock Australia Limited, North Sydney.Project code: AHW.087 ISBN: 1741910021 (Previously retrievable from www.mla.com.au).

This message is intended for the addressee named and may contain confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient, please delete it and notify the sender. Views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender, and are not necessarily the views of their organisation.

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Managing Worms Webinar (QLD)

TO: WormMail List (recip undisclosed)   cc others (apols if you get this twice)    WormMail 201002151520

‘May be of interest.

This webinar will likely contain material that is generally applicable as well as material that pertains in particular to south eastern Queensland, which has summer dominant rainfall (more so than northern NSW) and warmer conditions than the tablelands of NSW.

Regarding the major roundworms, sheep worm burdens in SE Qld are dominated by Haemonchus (H) and Trichostronglyus (T) species and relatively few Ostertagia (Teladorsagia) (O), whereas northern NSW has H+O+T, and central and southern NSW, with non-seasonal and winter rainfall, has T+O, and sometimes H.

Maxine Lyndal-Murphy is an experienced pathologist, and is a member of the WormBoss team.

Regards

Steve L

Reminder !
Managing Worms Webinar

Given the recent wet and humid conditions, do you know if worms are affecting your sheep?

Webinar Thursday 18th February 2010 at 1pm (Queensland time)   (= 2 PM in NSW / VIC / TAS)

Presented by Maxine Lyndal-Murphy, Agri-Science Queensland
a service of the Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation

  • What you can do now to prevent worms in your sheep (given the recent wet/humid conditions)
  • New haemonchus dipstick test
  • Drenches and drench resistance
  • WormBoss – where to find more information on worms

To register for this webinar click here.

What is a Webinar?

  • A webinar is a seminar in which you can participate without leaving your home or office.
  • You participate while sitting at your desk in front of your computer and using a nearby phone.  
  • It only takes an hour out of your time and you don’t have to travel anywhere to hear the latest information.
  • It won’t cost you a cent, just an hour out of your time.

For further information contact:
Alex Stirton, Agri-Science Queensland, Charleville 07 4654 4212 or alex.stirton@deedi.qld.gov.au

Support with registering and joining the webinar is available from:

This message is intended for the addressee named and may contain confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient, please delete it and notify the sender. Views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender, and are not necessarily the views of their organisation.

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lectin staining to identify Haemonchus eggs

TO: WormMail  (recip undisclosed).    WormMail 2010.02.11

There have been various articles of late regarding use of peanut lectin to differentiate Haemonchus contortusfrom other strongyle eggs in faecal samples from ruminants, for example sheep.

Examples of some of these articles are pasted below.

The Oregon test is based on a publication by Dr Dieter Palmer, Senior Veterinary Immunologist and Parasitologist with the Western Australian Department of Agriculture and Fish Food?, located at the Animal Health Laboratories at South Perth (Palmer and McCombe, 1996).

Dr Palmer been in correspondence with the researchers from Oregon over the last couple of years.

Palmer and colleagues have been offering the test for many years at their South Perth laboratory. I understand that, with the aid of funding from the Australian Sheep Cooperative research Centre, they are currently simplifying the techniques and extending it to other laboratories in Australia.

Reference:

Palmer DG and McCombe IL (1996). Lectin staining of Trichostronglyid Nematode Eggs of Sheep: Rapid Identification of Haemonchus contortus Eggs with Peanut Agglutinin. International Journal of Parasitology, 42:6; 447-450.

Regards

SL      2010.02.11

Veterinarian/State worm control coordinator

I & I NSW


New lectin staining test quickly detects Haemonchus contortus

19 Jan 2010
Researchers at Oregon State University and the University of Georgia have developed an improved, more efficient method to test for Haemonchus contortus, or “barber pole” worms, a species that is very pathogenic to sheep, goats and llamas.

The new lectin staining test is based on a peanut agglutinin that binds to eggs of the parasite and can be easily visualized with a microscope using ultraviolet light. It’s an improved version of previous technology developed by scientists in Australia that was slower, less effective, more expensive and required more advanced training to perform, researchers say.

A faster, easier and less expensive way to test for the presence and quantity of Haemonchus contortus will help sheep ranchers deal with this problem more quickly and effectively, optimize their management practices, and sometimes avoid costly therapies. As with any animal health concerns, results should be reviewed with a veterinarian so that proper treatment programs can be put in place, researchers said.

The test requires only a small amount of feces, and results are available in as little as two days. Anyone interested in obtaining the test can get information on sampling, test results and fees from the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at OSU (Tel:+1 541/752-5501), or Bob Storey (Dept. of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga., 30602 or 706/542-0195). FAMACHA© information can be obtained through Bob Storey or by sending an email to famacha@uga.edu.

[/source]

http://www.vetsweb.com/news/new-lectin-staining-test-quickly-detects-haemonchus-contortus-825.html

26 January 2010
New test may help address costly parasite in sheep industry

Researchers at Oregon State University and the University of Georgia have
developed an improved, more efficient method to test for the most serious
of the parasitic worms in sheep, a problem that causes hundreds of millions
of dollars in losses every year to the global sheep and wool industry. This
technology is now available, and will allow a faster, easier and less
expensive way to test for the presence and quantity of Haemonchus
contortus, or “barber pole” worms, a species that is very pathogenic to
sheep, goats and llamas. This will help sheep ranchers deal with this
problem more quickly and effectively, optimize their management practices,
and sometimes avoid costly therapies. Findings about the new test were just
published in Veterinary Parasitology, a professional journal. “This
particular parasite is much more pathogenic in sheep than other worms, and
previous methods to detect it were very labor intensive and often not
commercially practical,” said Michael Kent, an OSU professor of
microbiology. “Now ranchers and veterinarians can test for this problem and
target their management or treatment strategies much more effectively.”

This parasite causes significant production losses, and in some cases it’s
the limiting factor to sheep production on pasture lands. The nematodes can
cause internal bleeding, which in turn can lead to anemia, poor food
conversion and growth, low protein levels, reduced lamb production and wool
yield, and in some cases death. Known as the barber pole or wire worm,
Haemonchus contortus is a blood-sucking parasite that pierces the lining of
the sheep’s stomach. It’s a prolific egg producer, releasing up to 10,000
eggs per day, and often causes problems in warmer climates or during the
summer. Once an infection is demonstrated, expensive treatments or complex
management strategies are often needed to address it. The new lectin
staining test is based on a peanut agglutinin that binds to eggs of the
parasite and can be easily visualized with a microscope using ultraviolet
light. It’s an improved version of previous technology developed by
scientists in Australia that was slower, less effective, more expensive and
required more advanced training to perform, researchers say.

The relatively inexpensive test was developed by microbiologists and
veterinary doctors at OSU and UGA, and is now available through those
institutions. Its use should continue to expand and become more readily
available around the world, Kent said. The test may also be of special
value to ranchers interested in organic production of sheep, goats and
llamas, who try to avoid use of chemical treatments in maintaining the
health of their animals. “One of the current testing tools commonly used by
sheep and goat farmers in dealing with H. contortus is the FAMACHA© method,
in which the farmer compares the animal’s lower eyelid color to swatches on
a card to determine the animal’s anemia status,” said Bob Storey, a UGA
researcher who co-developed the lectin staining test. “This method only
works in situations where H. contortus is the primary parasite in a given
herd’s worm population. The new lectin staining test allows for a faster
and less expensive method of determining the predominance of H. contortus
in a herd worm population, thereby making it easier for producers to
determine if FAMACHA© can be a useful tool for them. Additionally, for the
veterinarian dealing with an anemic animal and a heavy parasite burden, the
lectin staining test provides quick feedback as to whether the anemia is
parasite-based or may be due to another cause.” The test requires only a
small amount of feces, and results are available in as little as two days.
Anyone interested in obtaining the test can get information on sampling,
test results and fees from the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at OSU (
http://oregonstate.edu/vetmed/diagnostic or 541/752-5501), or Bob Storey
(Dept. of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University
of Georgia, Athens, Ga., 30602 or 706/542-0195). As with any animal health
concerns, results should be reviewed with a veterinarian so that proper
treatment programs can be put in place, researchers said.

Science Daily
January 26, 2010

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Primefact 911 Alpaca worms – an overview

To WormMail list (+ others)  (recip undisclosed)

Primefact 911 Alpaca worms – an overview has been published to our website:

http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/livestock/health/specific/other/alpaca-worms

There is also a link to it under the Latest Publications heading on the Ag homepage.  http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture

‘Apologies if you get this more than once (list overlap)


Steve   10 Feb 2010

Veterinarian / State Worm Control Coordinator
Industry and Investment NSW ~ Primary Industries
Armidale District Office

Primary Industries ~ LIVESTOCK HEALTH INCL WORMS pages  http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/livestock/health

Primary Industries ~ OFFICE DIRECTORY  http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/aboutus/about/office

WORMBOSS  http://www.wool.com/wormboss  (Please bear with us: we are trying to fix the problems since being moved to the AWI website)

AUSWORMMAIL http://auswormmail.wordpress.com

May be of interest? :  http://www.raisin-hell.com/2010/02/how-sick-do-we-have-to-get.html

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Profarm Courses for "DIY FWECing"

FWEC Courses-central-southern NSW-Archbold-Hession-8feb 2010.doc (261 KB)
View this on posterous

TO: WormMail list etc (recip undisclosed)   (apologies if you get this more than once -(list overlap)

More information…

In the previous ‘WormMail’ (below), I made reference to possible courses in venues other  than Tamworth (northern NSW) and Camden (near Sydney).

The Profarm Person at Camden, Maryke Archbold-Hession has prepared a list (see attached) of possible other venues. which include Wagga Wagga, Berry, Goulburn, Mudgee, Dubbo, Tocal and Orange. Maryke has sent this to various groups within Primary Industries.

I can only be involved in the five Tamworth courses (time constraints).

Contacts for further information on the Tamworth-based courses appear below (Cassie or Julie).

Maryke or Lex Myhill are the contacts for other locations (essentially central and southern NSW): see attached Word doc for details.

Consult the Profarm web pages or various flyers for information, but make sure you get in touch with the appropriate contacts in order to get the most up-to-date information, or to register.

Don’t contact me: I know nothing.  🙂

Other states? I am not sure what is on offer in other states. For WA, the Albany office of the Department of Agriculture and Food may have more information (Phone: +61 8 9892 8444 Fax: +61 8 9841 2707 e-mail to: albany@agric.wa.gov.au ).

Thanks

SL

Veterinarian/State coordinator-internal parasites

http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/

www.wool.com/Wormboss

http://auswormmail.wordpress.com/

From: Stephen Love/DII/NSW
Date: 04/02/2010 12:40 PM
Subject: Profarm Courses for "DIY FWECing"


To: WormMail mailing list (recip. undisclosed) bcc: various

A number of these course have been planned for 2010, at Tamworth and Camden and possibly other venues.

For updates and further information check: http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/profarm/profarm_course_calendar

For questions and feedback:  http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/profarm/contact

A copy of the Tamworth flyer is attached (PDF).

Tamworth contact details: To register phone Cassie Gardiner on 6763 1276 (M:0488238261) or
Julie Chapman on 6763 1285 (Both are extremely helpful and clearly under-paid :-).
or email: tamworth.profarm@industry.nsw.gov.au

COURSE OUTLINE
A one day course for those interested in managing internal parasites and worms in their
livestock and developing an understanding of targeted control options. Participants will
learn how to perform basic faecal egg counts for worms in sheep, goats, cattle, alpacas
and horses.
This practical course will be delivered in our training workroom by experienced I&I NSW
(Primary Industries) staff. A summary of the course content is as follows –
• Introduction to parasites
• Basic worm cycles
• Learn to use a microscope
• Identify how to take samples and complete faecal egg counts
• Identify different worm eggs under a microscope
• Analyse results from samples
• Control options.

Regards

Stephen Love
Armidale

 Sheep CRC Summer 2010 Newsletter:  http://www.sheepcrc.org.au/news-and-events/newsletters/1264637050.php
(Congratulations Gareth! 🙂  )

Other:

Fructose and healthy children?

May be of interest:   http://www.raisin-hell.com/2010/02/wheres-f-word-err-fructose-in-healthy.html

SITH HAPPENS:  

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Profarm Courses for "DIY FWECing"

Faecal Egg Count Flyer MARCH 2010 Tam.pdf (98 KB)
View this on posterous

To: WormMail mailing list (recip. undisclosed) bcc: various

A number of these course have been planned for 2010, at Tamworth and Camden and possibly other venues.

For updates and further information check: http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/profarm/profarm_course_calendar

For questions and feedback:  http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/profarm/contact

A copy of the Tamworth flyer is attached (PDF).

Tamworth contact details: To register phone Cassie Gardiner on 6763 1276 (M:0488238261) or
Julie Chapman on 6763 1285 (Both are extremely helpful and clearly under-paid :-).
or email: tamworth.profarm@industry.nsw.gov.au

COURSE OUTLINE
A one day course for those interested in managing internal parasites and worms in their
livestock and developing an understanding of targeted control options. Participants will
learn how to perform basic faecal egg counts for worms in sheep, goats, cattle, alpacas
and horses.
This practical course will be delivered in our training workroom by experienced I&I NSW
(Primary Industries) staff. A summary of the course content is as follows –
• Introduction to parasites
• Basic worm cycles
• Learn to use a microscope
• Identify how to take samples and complete faecal egg counts
• Identify different worm eggs under a microscope
• Analyse results from samples
• Control options.

Regards

Stephen Love
Armidale

 Sheep CRC Summer 2010 Newsletter:  http://www.sheepcrc.org.au/news-and-events/newsletters/1264637050.php
(Congratulations Gareth! 🙂  )

Other:

Fructose and healthy children?

May be of interest:   http://www.raisin-hell.com/2010/02/wheres-f-word-err-fructose-in-healthy.html

This message is intended for the addressee named and may contain confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient, please delete it and notify the sender. Views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender, and are not necessarily the views of their organisation.

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